Strange Tails

Strange Tails

We're delighted to have a strong population of strange-tailed tyrants at the reserve. So much so that we've adopted these beautiful and endangered birds as the symbol of the Trust

The growing diversity of the animals of Reserva Don Luis is a fresh source of delight every time we return.  We don't play favourites, but it's impossible not to engage more with some of our more conspicuous guests.  One of these is the strange-tailed tyrant.  The male is stoic in his tolerance of one of nature's strangest - and it would seem least practical - adaptations.  He's willing to suffer to be beautiful, and somehow manages to fly with tail feathers that were surely designed for a bird three times his size.

We love his perseverance; his resolution to succeed against challenge, and his ability to prove that anything is possible.  He's appearing in growing numbers on the Reserva Do Luis, and his success has become an allegory for, and a symbol of, our own.

When we started the process of updating and redesigning our website, we wanted to adopt an image that symbolised our aims and our challenges.  This brave little flycatcher, with his indomitable character, was the perfect choice.

The logo is a stylised profile of a male tyrant, silhouetted against the sunrise.  We coloured the sun the blue of the Argentinian flag in honour of this country's beauty, its climate and the breathtaking span of magnificent animals that it nurtures.

More about strange-tailed tyrants>>

Leo volunteer with bat

Help Needed

We need your help to provide a safe, sustainable environment for these irreplaceable and seriously threatened animals. Your donations - however small - are very welcome indeed, and if you can volunteer useful skills then we'd love to hear from you!

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Bat Species of Ibera

The Esteros del Ibera is a vast, relatively undiscovered wetland and, until recently, little study has been done on its bat species and certainly none in the northern gateway known as Cambyreta.

Due to the amount of water and thus insects, it is a paradise for insectivorous bats. Limitations are the amount of available roosts as there are few buildings and the trees are generally shorter than 15m. It is likely that bats come to hunt in the area from some of the small towns and villages around the wetlands. We also have an abundance of native fruit which attracts fruit eating species especially in the warmer months.

However we have found several tree roosts and the two houses, cabana and shed at the reserve are teeming with bats - mostly Molossus temminckii or Dwarf Dog-faced Bat and Eumops patagonicus or Patagonian Bonneted Bat.

We are well underway on a new bat call library for Cambyreta and for this we need many bat recordings.  We have already recorded around 16 different species of bat around the houses and now own a Wildlife Acoustics SM4Bat. This we are placing in remote areas for around a week at a time and analysing the results using Kaleidoscope Pro. We also record all hand releases of insectivorous bats.

The large lakes in Ibera are ideal for the family Noctilionidae which are known as the fishing Bats.  We captured both Noctilio albiventris and its larger cousin, Noctilio leporinus along the banks of the River Parana in 2018. They both hunt low over the water, the former hunting insects and the latter small fish. We have some good recordings of both species on release and the shape of the pulse is very distinctive.

The majority of our bat research nowadays includes capturing bats for ID and biometrics in Corrientes and surrounding provinces, in particular Misiones. We have some high end equipment including 2 Harp traps, 1 triple high set up as well as a double high, many singles, hand nets etc. We also have a team of volunteers which assist in the running of our night netting sessions.

Our authorisations to conduct bat research in the province of Corrientes have been approved by Recurses Naturales and Parques y Reservas. &We also now have authorisation to conduct research in Misiones&, our neighbouring province to the NE, which has several new species for us to study.

We put up wooden Kent bat boxes at the reserve and one is constantly occupied by a small Molossidae bat, most likely Eumops patagonicus. We designed a "Bat Condo" based on the Wisconsin design and that has been up at the reserve since June 2018. So far we have only seen a Myotis species using this large bathouse but still expect others to be attracted in due course.

The following photos are of bats we have caught, measured, identified, photographed, recorded and released over the past three years. Most of these bats can be found in Corrientes, and the majority in the Ibera Marshes.

Anoura caudifer

Anoura caudifer

Tailed Tailless Bat

Artibeus fimbriatus

Artibeus fimbriatus

Fringed Fruit-eating Bat

Artibeus lituratus

Artibeus lituratus

Great Fruit-eating Bat

Carollia perspicillata

Carollia perspicillata

Seba's Short-tailed Bat

Chrotopterus auritus

Chrotopterus auritus

largest-bat-in-Argentina

Desmodus rotundus

Desmodus rotundus

Common Vampire Bat

Eptesicus brasiliensis

Eptesicus brasiliensis

Brazilian Brown Bat

Eptesicus diminutus

Eptesicus diminutus

Diminutive Serotine

Eptesicus furinalis

Eptesicus furinalis

Eptesicus furinalis

Eumops bonariensis

Eumops bonariensis

Peter's Mastiff Bat

Eumops patagonicus

Eumops patagonicus

Patagonian Bonnetted Bat

Glosophaga soricina

Glosophaga soricina

Pallas's Long-tongued Bat

Histiotus macrotus

Histiotus macrotus

Histiotus macrotus

Lasiurus blossevillii

Lasiurus blossevillii

Western Red Bat

Lasiurus cinereus

Lasiurus cinereus

Hoary Bat

Lasiurus ega

Lasiurus ega

Southern Yellow Bat

Molossops neglectus

Molossops neglectus

Rufous-Dog-faced Bat

Molossops temminckii

Molossops temminckii

Dwarf Dog-faced Bat

Molossus molossus

Molossus molossus

Velvety Free-tailed Bat

Molossus rufus

Molossus rufus

Black Mastiff Bat

Myotis albescens

Myotis albescens

Silver-tipped Myotis

Myotis levis

Myotis levis

Yellowish Myotis

Myotis nigricans

Myotis nigricans

Black Myotis

Myotis riparius

Myotis riparius

Riparian Myotis

Noctilio albiventris

Noctilio albiventris

Lesser Bulldog Bat

Noctilio leporinus

Noctilio leporinus

Greater Bulldog Bat

Nyctinomops laticaudatus

Nyctinomops laticaudatus

Broad-eared Bat

Platyrrhinus lineatus

Platyrrhinus lineatus

White-lined Bat

Pygoderma bilabiatum

Pygoderma bilabiatum

Ipanema Bat

Sturnira lilium

Sturnira lilium

Little Yellow-shouldered Bat

Tadarida brasiliensis

Tadarida brasiliensis

Brazilian Free-tailed Bat