Strange Tails

Strange Tails

We're delighted to have a strong population of strange-tailed tyrants at the reserve. So much so that we've adopted these beautiful and endangered birds as the symbol of the Trust

The growing diversity of the animals of Reserva Don Luis is a fresh source of delight every time we return.  We don't play favourites, but it's impossible not to engage more with some of our more conspicuous guests.  One of these is the strange-tailed tyrant.  The male is stoic in his tolerance of one of nature's strangest - and it would seem least practical - adaptations.  He's willing to suffer to be beautiful, and somehow manages to fly with tail feathers that were surely designed for a bird three times his size.

We love his perseverance; his resolution to succeed against challenge, and his ability to prove that anything is possible.  He's appearing in growing numbers on the Reserva Do Luis, and his success has become an allegory for, and a symbol of, our own.

When we started the process of updating and redesigning our website, we wanted to adopt an image that symbolised our aims and our challenges.  This brave little flycatcher, with his indomitable character, was the perfect choice.

The logo is a stylised profile of a male tyrant, silhouetted against the sunrise.  We coloured the sun the blue of the Argentinian flag in honour of this country's beauty, its climate and the breathtaking span of magnificent animals that it nurtures.

More about strange-tailed tyrants>>

Leo volunteer with bat

Help Needed

We need your help to provide a safe, sustainable environment for these irreplaceable and seriously threatened animals. Your donations - however small - are very welcome indeed, and if you can volunteer useful skills then we'd love to hear from you!

Read More

Mammals of Iberá

Esteros del Ibera

The Iberá natural reserve is a protected area of some 13,000kmin the province of Corrientes in NE Argentina.  The area consists of swamps, bogs, lakes, floating islands, lagoons, streams and a certain amount of grassland which hosts a wide variety of mammals.  There are also small to medium sized woods dotted around the natural reserve in which live the Black Howler Monkeys.

The Pampas deer is critically endangered in Argentina due it it being hunted to near extinction before it became protected.  These mammals tend to live in the drier areas of  Iberá, often alongside cattle.

The Marsh Deer is locally relatively common in the Ibera basin and we expect to see at least one per day at the Reserve.

The Giant Anteater has been extant from the area since the 1970s but has recently been re-introduced by 'Conservation Land Trust' who run other similar projects.  The marshes are riddled with anthills and termite hills making this area very attractive to these mammals.  It is however on the southern limit for this species and they can be adversely affected by cold winters here.

There are at least 16 species of bat here, of which we have managed to mist net and examine 14. Bat research has been our main project since 2016 and we have a regular team of 4 that carry out research in Corrientes and now also Misiones. We now have hundreds hours of bat recordings from the reserve as well as recordings of bats on release.  We are making our own Argentine bat call library as there is no official one in the country.

There are many nocturnal species here including  two species of fox, the Crab-eating Racoon, Geoffroy's Cat, Plains Vizcacha, Skunk, two species of Opossum, Maned Wolf,  three species of Armadillo and of course the bats.  Then Maned Wolf has been seen on several occasions around our reserve and frequently heard calling at night. However it prefers drier conditions so when we are back to being a wetland as we have been since 2014  it moves away.  However it was heard calling in September 2015 so we are keeping an eye out for footprints and droppings.

The images that follow are mammals that are found at Reserva Don Luis and the surrounding area. For example we do not have any Opossums mainly because our woodlands are small and isolated. We have never seen a Jaguarundi nor a Hare and we only have 2 species of Armadillo.

Anoura caudifer

Anoura caudifer

Tailed Tailless Bat

Artibeus fimbriatus

Artibeus fimbriatus

Fringed Fruit-eating Bat

Artibeus lituratus

Artibeus lituratus

Great Fruit-eating Bat

Black Howler Monkey (male)

Black Howler Monkey (male)

Alouatta caraya

Capybara, Carpincho

Capybara, Carpincho

Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris

Carollia perspicillata

Carollia perspicillata

Seba's Short-tailed Bat

Chrotopterus auritus

Chrotopterus auritus

largest-bat-in-Argentina

Coypu, Nutrea

Coypu, Nutrea

Myocastor coypus

Crab-eating Racoon, Aguara Pope

Crab-eating Racoon, Aguara Pope

Procyon cancrivorus

Desmodus rotundus

Desmodus rotundus

Common Vampire Bat

Eptesicus brasiliensis

Eptesicus brasiliensis

Brazilian Brown Bat

Eptesicus diminutus

Eptesicus diminutus

Diminutive Serotine

Eptesicus furinalis

Eptesicus furinalis

Eptesicus furinalis

Eumops bonariensis

Eumops bonariensis

Peter's Mastiff Bat

Eumops patagonicus

Eumops patagonicus

Patagonian Bonnetted Bat

Geoffroys Cat

Geoffroys Cat

Oncefelis geoffroyi

Giant Anteater

Giant Anteater

Mymecophaga tridactyla

Glosophaga soricina

Glosophaga soricina

Pallas's Long-tongued Bat

Gray Fox, Zorro Gris Pampeano

Gray Fox, Zorro Gris Pampeano

Dusicyon gymnocerus

Grey Brocket Deer

Grey Brocket Deer

Corsuela Parda

Histiotus macrotus

Histiotus macrotus

Histiotus macrotus

Jaguar

Jaguar

Panthera onca

Lasiurus blossevillii

Lasiurus blossevillii

Western Red Bat

Lasiurus cinereus

Lasiurus cinereus

Hoary Bat

Lasiurus ega

Lasiurus ega

Southern Yellow Bat

Maned Wolf, Aguara Guazu

Maned Wolf, Aguara Guazu

Chrysocyon Brachyurus

Marsh Deer

Marsh Deer

Blastocerus dichotomus

Molossops neglectus

Molossops neglectus

Rufous-Dog-faced Bat

Molossops temminckii

Molossops temminckii

Dwarf Dog-faced Bat

Molossus molossus

Molossus molossus

Velvety Free-tailed Bat

Molossus rufus

Molossus rufus

Black Mastiff Bat

Myotis albescens

Myotis albescens

Silver-tipped Myotis

Myotis levis

Myotis levis

Yellowish Myotis

Myotis nigricans

Myotis nigricans

Black Myotis

Myotis riparius

Myotis riparius

Riparian Myotis

Neotropical River Otter

Neotropical River Otter

Lontra longicaudis

Nine-banded Armadillo

Nine-banded Armadillo

Dasypus novemcinctus

Noctilio albiventris

Noctilio albiventris

Lesser Bulldog Bat

Noctilio leporinus

Noctilio leporinus

Greater Bulldog Bat

Nyctinomops laticaudatus

Nyctinomops laticaudatus

Broad-eared Bat

Pampas Cavy, Cuis

Pampas Cavy, Cuis

Cavia aperea

Pampas Deer

Pampas Deer

Ozotoceros bezoarticus

Plains Vizcacha, Vizcacha

Plains Vizcacha, Vizcacha

Lagostomus maximus

Platyrrhinus lineatus

Platyrrhinus lineatus

White-lined Bat

Pygoderma bilabiatum

Pygoderma bilabiatum

Ipanema Bat

Seven-banded Armadillo

Seven-banded Armadillo

Dasypus septemcinctus

Southern Tamandua

Southern Tamandua

Tamandua tetradactyla

Sturnira lilium

Sturnira lilium

Little Yellow-shouldered Bat

Tadarida brasiliensis

Tadarida brasiliensis

Brazilian Free-tailed Bat